top of page

Our Story: A History of Windward Senior Day Care Center (1974 - 2008)

The following story of the Windward Senior Day Care Center is a collaboration of the memories of Natalie Oda, Agnes Tullis, Sadie Coarsey, and A.T. “Red” Miller who came up with the idea of melding them together.


It was originally published in 2009 as a part of the Kailua Historical Society and Windward Senior Day Care Center's goal to capture the lifestyle and spirit of by-gone times. We are very proud of the impact the Center has had on the community since its beginnings in 1974 and feel the story is worthy of being incorporated with other highlights of Kailua's history.


 

OUR STORY



WHERE THERE'S A WILL THERE'S A WAY


In the early 1970s, a number of Protestant churches In the Ko'olaupoko District of O'ahu (see footnote) began to explore ways to work more closely together in the interests of Christian unity. As a result, in 1972, they created the Windward Coalition of Churches to collaborate in the areas of worship and music, education, and social outreach. Of the several working groups formed, the Social Concerns Committee (SOCCO) began to look at what social services were needed in the community, and through an informal survey by students from the Sociology Department of the University of Hawai'I, it was revealed that there was a definite lack of services for the elderly.


In 1972 when the State Hospital in Kane'ohe closed its doors to elderly care, Castle Medical Center opened "the Third Floor" with 35 beds for long-term care. Also, then Ann Pearl Nursing Facility in Kaneohe began as a care home for State Hospital patients no longer needing institutionalization.


Additionally, a number of private adult care homes had been started, each strictly limited to a maximum of five. All this activity overlooked the reality that there were many working families with parents and grandparents who were being left at home during the week and could benefit from a nearby care center.



Founder, Hope Morley Gray
Founder, Hope Morley Gray

Kailua resident Hope Morley Gray, whose invalid mother lived with her, clearly saw that need.


She also learned from her daughter Laura who, as a nursing student at Queen's Hospital, became aware that some of the privately operated care homes were not doing a good job. As a result, Hope presented all this to the SOCCO membership and, in short order, the decision was made to establish the Windward Seniors' Day Care Center. Its function was to provide a safe and affordable place for elders, left to their own devices during the day when their family caregivers were at work; the basic concept was to provide hands-on, loving, affordable care on week days.


The original building next to St. Christopher's Church
The original building next to St. Christopher's Church

First, a facility had to be found. Fortunately, St. Christopher's Episcopal Church on Kainalu Street in Kailua had a modest residence with a small cottage, used only for church classes on the weekends and by the AA at night. It made sense to all involved that it was on ideal location for use during the week as a seniors' care center.




Rev. Claude duTeil with Betty Staudinger
Rev. Claude duTeil with Betty Staudinger

After a rental agreement was concluded with the church, someone was needed to deal with all the complexities required to get State approval. With her experience as a member of the State Parks Board and on administrator at Mid-Pacific Institute, Hope knew how to deal with things like that and, with the help of Rev. Claude duTeil, rector of St. Christopher's, and attorney Jock Lockwood, she proceeded to get the paperwork done.


An application for a Charter of Incorporation was approved by the State on March 27 1973, establishing the non-profit Windward Seniors' Day Care Center as a corporation with on initial lRS tax-exempt determination with Hope Gray as president, Joseph Kunz as vice-president, and John Liebmann Jr. as secretary-treasurer. Full tax-exempt status was granted under IRS 501 (c)(3) one year later. The term "seniors" had been carefully chosen instead of the more popular "adult", although elderly would have been just as appropriate. Later the apostrophe was dropped for the sake of simplicity. The Charter of Incorporation also provided for by-laws to establish the powers of the officers to be elected for two-year terms. In addition to the elective positions, the center was organized to include committees to cover personnel and finances.


 

A DIFFICULT START


Hope then applied for and received $6,000 from the Hawai'i Community Foundation for improvements to the house, including a wheelchair ramp, fence, and furnishings such as cots, bedding, tables, and chairs.


At this point Natalie Oda had come on the scene ready to assist Hope - both agreeing to work as volunteers. They had met as members of FISH, a group of volunteers in Honolulu organized to provide assistance to the needy, and both were dedicated members of SOCCO. After a news campaign to attract participants, June 1st 1974, become a red-letter day for the Windward community when its first day care center opened for business with four participants, two men and two women, and one staff member plus the director.


On a shoestring budget a marketing brochure was produced to serve notice that finally there was a place in Windward Oahu to be an alternative to traditional care and nursing homes, providing day care as well as activities for intellectual, emotional, and spiritual needs of the elderly and companionship for people left at home during the day.


The Center operated from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M five days a week with a very affordable monthly charge of $15O per person; several years later those without personal funds became eligible for financial assistance from the State's Department of Social Services and Housing.


Activities consisted of simple yoga exercises, craftwork under Natalie's expertise, music and singing, and worship services. At first, each participant brought a brown-bag lunch thereby providing a lot of fun as they were traded, switched, eaten, or left uneaten. Later, arrangements were made with nearby Seagull School to provide lunch for $24 per month.


A few months later participation had dropped to just two; of the original four, one had died and another needed to go to a nursing home. However, the family whose father had passed away gave a donation to keep the Center open because, in his last few months "his life had been so full of life, fun, and positive outlook - enjoying every day at the center".


With only two participants, things were looking pretty grim, but as Natalie noted, "histories of similar centers show a notoriously hard time during the first year.” Ever-optimistic she stated "We're very hopeful that recruitment efforts will bring more clients and that we'll be able to pull it through.”


Natalie's memories of those first days are best recorded in her own words: "The program consisted of reading the morning paper together and discussing the news, doing the crossword puzzles, singing, doing simple craftwork and easy exercises, and snacking. Volunteers provided snacks as well as toilet paper, napkins, and more.


In the afternoon, Hope would often take the participants for a ride in her car to see the sights and in season to pick mangos and flowers.


The State required that we provide spiritual as well as emotional and nutritional support and exercises. One of the participants was a retired minister who constantly injected his beliefs on all, loudly and vehemently at every opportunity—thus becoming the 'in-house pastor', like it or not.


With the threat of closure ever present, we canvassed doctor's offices, the churches, and service clubs to spread the news about the benefits of adult day care. Keep in mind this was 1975 and it was a relatively new idea. There was only one other adult center in Hawai'i and that was in Honolulu at the University Baptist Church.


Drs. Roger and Anna-Marie Brault, Red Miller, and Hope Gray
Drs. Roger and Anna-Marie Brault, Red Miller, and Hope Gray

The members of SOCCO joined the struggle. They spoke at churches and service clubs such as Rotary, Kiwanis, and Soroptimists. Harold Hostetler, local reporter for The


Honolulu Advertiser, wrote a most welcome story, describing the Center and its difficulties, which went a long way to interest more families in placing their elderly parents there. For The Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Tomi Knaefler wrote articles that were also instrumental in helping promote the program and by December the number of participants had gradually grown to twelve, thus assuring permanence.


Former Director, Natalie Oda
Former Director, Natalie Oda

Finally, it was possible to recognize, with modest salaries, the hard work Hope and Natalie had done to achieve this success. Hope hod been doing the job of bookkeeping and was greatly relieved when Red Miller showed up one day looking for a way to help out and she unloaded the financial books on him. When Hope stepped down as director after their marriage, it was natural for Natalie to take over. From her college years in New York City, her eyes had been opened to the importance for individuals to serve the needs of society, something she devoutly practiced as a member of the Methodist church.


Support from the community continued with volunteers showing up to help in goodly numbers. A color-TV set was donated by Herb Sulkin, proprietor of Herb's TV in Kailua, and when that set gave up the ghost, Progressive TV in Kailua provided a steady supply of workable sets for the next twenty years.


Even more helpful was the donation by Albert Wong from Palace Realty in Kailua of a 1970 Chrysler sedan which could hold up to 6 passengers, most of whom were smallish women who could be buckled in and cuddled-up together. Up to this time, clients had been delivered by family members, so with transportation available, it was possible to make the center truly "Windward" covering the area all the way from Waimanalo to Kahalu'u. Part of the fun each day was picking up and delivering clients from all those communities along Kamehameha Highway, with the driver being anyone who was available, the only requirement in those days was a regular driver’s license.


Eleanor "Mitch" and Tom Leedham
Eleanor "Mitch" and Tom Leedham

Glynn and Ruth Todd and Tom Leedham
Glynn and Ruth Todd and Tom Leedham

 

TIME MARCHES ON


As director, Natalie was soon joined by Agnes Tullis as her assistant and, with improved finances, it was possible to bring on the staff at minimal salaries those who had been faithful volunteers: Joanne Smith, Wanda Wylie, Ila Moe McClelland (who generously donated a portion of her AT&T stock to the Center), Dianne Esposito, and Pat Conway.


New volunteers eager to serve showed up including Bill Justis, Mary St. Vincent, Eleanor "Mitch" Leedham, Bill and Betty Smith, and Esther Temple. Ruth Johannsen and Myrabeth Hughes would come to play and sing and Margaret Gray from the Kailua Library staff would bring books to read aloud. And then, of particular importance, were the pastors of the cooperating Coalition churches providing weekly devotional services: Claude duTeil came from St Christopher's just across the driveway, and coming from "church row" were Bruce Craft from St. John Lutheran, Ron Foxx and Paul Brennon from Kailua United Methodist, and Warren Studer and his wife Harriet from Christ Church Uniting Disciples and Presbyterians, and over Aikahi way was Ford Coffman from the Windward United Church of Christ. Although the Roman Catholics did not participate in the SOCCO, Fr. Mike Ryan from nearby St. Anthony's Church was glad to come over for devotions.


As the participant count increased, a bookkeeper/accountant was needed to take care of State-mandated employee accounts such as taxes, insurance, SSI, and TDI. Fortunately, the perfect person for the job was found working in her own business in Kailua. That was Daryl Lanning who, from her nearby Kailua office, was able to keep things running smoothly. There was also the need for more furniture and to save money. Natalie found out about the warehouse where the State stored used articles of all kinds and were there for the taking. On several occasions, she collared Red Miller to go with her to pick out things of use, and they were able to get a number of good chairs and tables that way. Moreover, more room was needed as the building's size was limited to twelve participants and there was a waiting list.


Our new building, under construction
Our new building, under construction

A grant application was made to the Hawai'i Community Foundation for funds to expand the building, and there was the possibility of the State Department of Transportation providing a van. When the St. Christopher's vestry was asked for permission to expand, they revealed their plans for a capital building campaign and suggested the Center join them in that effort, which was gladly accepted. They published a beautiful brochure encouraging donors to give either to the church organ fund, a new social hall, or the senior center. The day center was oversubscribed ($120,000). One donor gave enough for the organ, but the social hall would have to wait for another time.



 

GROWING PAINS


With an assured financial base, plans were drawn up for a new building. So on October 1 1982, the old structures were demolished and day care was temporarily moved to the Kane'ohe Higashi Hong­wanji Mission. It was on Kea'ahala Rood in a huge Quonset Hut - certainly not pretty, but very functional. With the high ceiling, concrete floor, and no interior barriers, there was plenty of room to continue all activities, even to include wheelchair volleyball and wheelchair races. Quite a few Kane'ohe participants were picked up in the year and a half that it took to get permits, including EIS approval for the new building In Kailua.


Our New Chevy Van
Our New Chevy Van

There turned out to be more than enough grant money to furnish the new facility, so the foundation was asked if that money could be diverted to purchase a new van. That was approved, so a roomy Chevrolet van was purchased, making it now possible to have assured transportation for more participants. The State had awarded a license for 40 participants along with eight part-time staff aides, four of whom were permitted to drive the van. It was so nice and shiny it caught the eye of Henry Apo who would go out and wash it whenever he could.


At that time the Board of Directors consisted of the following: Eleanor Leedham as president, Charles Rogers as vice ­president, Carol Brown as secretary, and A.T. "Red" Miller as treasurer; with members Anna Maria Brault, Hope Miller, William Smith, Horace Williston, Herb Weatherwax, Glynn Todd, and Ann Waters.


Our New Building
Our New Building

When the much-improved facility at St. Christopher's was opened in January 1984, there was an average of 40 people each day and, as Agnes remembers, "Things were happening. Days at the Center were packed with fun and with activities of all kinds - even fishing trips. Nat was great with crafts. Participant needs were uppermost in the minds of all staff members, and they were met. Our people were enthusiastic, it was a lovely place. So much room for activities - we all just loved it.


One of our most remembered characters was Bill, in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. We so enjoyed him, and he seemed to adore being with us and the other participants. He even managed to find two girlfriends. One time while on a neighborhood walk, he and his "Lady of the Hour" disappeared. We were panicked and even called the police to help search for them. They were quickly spotted strolling hand in hand down the center of a nearby street. When asked, 'Where did you think you were going?' he replied, 'To a hotel!' There's no telling where they might have ended up - there are no hotels in Kailua! His wife told us that Bill considered the center to be his Club, a refuge from a world he could no longer comprehend - safe and secure and filled with loving, kind people. Whether the impairment Is mental, physical, or emotional, we welcome and appreciate all participants just the way they are."


 

LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL


When Natalie retired in 1998 after giving her all to the Center for 25 years, Sadie Carnes, who had proved her administrative abilities on the staff, was promoted to director. Here are her remembrances of her nine years with the Center:


Former Director, Sadie Carnes
Former Director, Sadie Carnes

"I was Introduced to WSDCC in November 1992 by my good friend and Board member, Felice Brown a.k.a. Doctor Rainbow. The annual craft fair was taking place on that Saturday and Felice knew I was looking for a job and she figured the Center could use another caregiver. So, the following week I filled out a job application noting my previous work at Aloha Health Care as Activity Director and was accepted and immediately started working as an aide. I was pleased to work with Director Natalie Oda, and caregivers Agnes, Tullis, Doro Chun, Rae Santos, Anarita Kanahele (also van driver), Cecy Brown, Lani Cho, Margaret Luis, and Betty Staudinger. Board members I remember were Dr. Bob LaReaux, Dr. Anna Maria Brault (who also acted as a medical consultant), Esther Temple, Red Miller, Ruth Johansen, Horace Williston, Tom Leedham, Hope Gray Miller, and Felice Brown. As the years passed, new board members who came in were Ann McClean, Dorothy Ono, Keith Shimomora, Rose Davis, Sean Moroney, and Michael Hillis.


Esther Temple and Felice Brown - "Doctor Rainbow"
Esther Temple and Felice Brown - "Doctor Rainbow"

“All staff members had shifts anywhere from 4 to 8 hours, four or five days a week. They all did a little bit of everything for the participants - greeting them in the morning, toileting them as needed, playing games with them, and doing craft projects with them—in addition to doing janitorial jobs around the place. Some of the jobs were assigned specifically to a certain staff member. For instance, one would open the door in the morning with Natalie; meals were served each day by a certain one; exercises were led by one person; medicines were dispensed by one person. Everything ran smoothly most of the time, but of course there were times when the toilets overflowed and eyeglasses, teeth, hearing aids—you name it—were lost. Every effort was made to locate these expensive items, including searching through trash cans and taking toilets apart."


Staff members: Rae Santos, Dora Chun, Anarita Kanahele, Lani Choi, Agnes Tullis, and Ann Ketelli
Staff members: Rae Santos, Dora Chun, Anarita Kanahele, Lani Choi, Agnes Tullis, and Ann Ketelli

“Along with some of the activities, especially crafts, Natalie did all the office work with assistance from the accountant, Daryl Lanning, who was the backbone of the financial aspect of the center. Our monthly newsletter went out to all participant families and to many churches and businesses on the island as well as to some mainland supporters. It always had news of the center, helpful information for caregivers, a calendar of upcoming events, and the monthly lunch menu. The newsletter evolved over the years from a typed page to a computer-generated copy with pictures and graphics. Until I came aboard, Natalie did most of the activity planning, however as a nationally Certified Activity Professional, in short order, I became the activity director. With many activities already in place, my job was to add to and lead the program."


"Felice, as Dr. Rainbow, was great in promoting intergenerational activities; children and pet animals were always a highlight of any day when we were privileged to have them visit. Our first computer was a used model donated by Ken Dowd of Aikahi Park. Then Ruth Johansen gave money for a new computer and software for billing and doing the newsletter. I learned to use them with assistance from anyone who happened to drop by and could help."


A close couple.
A close couple.

"The participants came from all walks of life, some from very humble back­grounds, though no less memorable than those who were prominent members of the community. We had doctors, dentists, teachers, school principals, entertainers, foreign correspondents, ministers, engineers (one who helped on the design and building of the Golden Gate Bridge), world travelers, and some who had never been off the islands. As you might guess, personalities were varied as well. Some found immediate friends and, in some cases, enemies. Some of the men found "true loves" and vice versa. Love was in the air. It was amazing that we could separate them at the end of the day and next morning, heaven forbid, what a to-do if they couldn't find chairs next to each other! And oh, what arguments over who "owned" a chair! We tried to institute the policy of first come-first served, but that didn't work too well. It was a relief that there were those who didn't care where they sat.”


“Many of the ladies became close friends. They might not remember each other's names from day to day, but they knew who their best friends were - as well as those they didn't like. Family members of the participants: spouses, children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, sometimes friends and neighbors - all shared as caregivers. Most were very loving and caring but as could be expected, there were some who were not."


Kane lei makers
Kane lei makers

"We were so fortunate in having a wide range of people interested in helping in many ways. If we needed something within reason, we needed only to ask and we usually got too much of what we asked for. Natalie kept everything stashed away in every nook and cranny. For Instance, one of the usual daily activities was to make fabric lei - as well as "real" plumeria lei. We never ran out of those items thanks to Natalie! We had a steady supply of old greeting cards and wallpaper samples. Agnes' Bakery under the management of Non De Mello donated day-old baked goods every week. At times we had more avocados, mangoes, and tangerines than we knew what to do with.



Wahine lei makers
Wahine lei makers

Every week we could count on at least one minister or church leader to spend time with us: Rev. Claude duTeil, Rev. Ron Faux, Rev. Paul Brennan, Rev. Richard Levy accompanied on the piano by Rev. Allan Fisher, Fr. Mike Ryan, ministers from the Salvation Army, and dedicated layman George Wiggins from St. Christopher's. Glynn Todd, and Jane Sholes, secretary at St. Christopher's, were always helpful in dealing with the church. I'm sure there are others who don't come to mind at this time. Christmas brought out many church and school groups to sing carols and pass out gifts. Melissa Short chose volunteerism at the Center as part of her platform in the Miss America pageant in 1996 and she spent a good deal of time singing and mingling with the participants.


The 'Lei of Love'
The 'Lei of Love'

The next year, Miss Hawaii 1997 visited the center as well. The community gave so much to us, we always felt compelled to give back - which we did in a variety of ways. After the bombing in Oklahoma City in 1996, Betty Staudinger had the idea of collecting dollar bills for a lei of love to send to Oklahoma. We figured $100 would do the job. We collected so much money the lei was long enough to stretch the full length of our back yard with several thousand dollars tied together. It was presented to Mayor Jeremy Harris in his office and his staff arranged to have it flown to Oklahoma. With the event being covered by television and radio, it was a proud moment for us. Some months later, a council member from Oklahoma City visited the center to deliver a personal thank you."



 

THE CENTER EXPANDS UP THE ROAD



Leedham Center at Kailua Baptist Church
Leedham Center at Kailua Baptist Church

Sadie continues: "The Center was becoming very crowded and it was apparent we needed to expand, so in 1997 the First Baptist Church on Kailua Road was chosen as the site for an additional operating location. This was made possible by the gift of $25,000 from Tom Leedham. It was named the Leedham Center in honor and memory of his wife Eleanor "Mitch", who had died not long before. We were warmly welcomed by the church members, and the additional space soon filled to capacity.”


Hope Center DHope Center dedication with Hope's family: Morely, Linda and Aaron; Kanoa, Lisa and Laleia, Merry, Alex and Sanjay; Red Milleredication
Hope Center dedication with Hope's family: Morely, Linda and Aaron; Kanoa, Lisa and Laleia, Merry, Alex and Sanjay; Red Miller

“The 25th anniversary was celebrated in December 2000 with a grand program, including a belly dance by Hope's granddaughter, and a surprise gift of $25,000 from the Miller/Gray family to help assure the Center's continuity. In appreciation for that and, in recognition of her role in the Center's beginnings, the original location was named for Hope, who had died in 1999.”


"Other fun events [at the center] included hat-making, followed by a fashion show, baking classes, sing-a-longs with Mary Schulmeister at the piano, muumuu fashion shows sponsored by Sears, skits by staff members, bingo, and regular appearances by the Kailua Seniors and other local groups with songs and dancing. And, not to forget, the wonderful "trips" we took with Don Huddleston and his beautiful color slides of his travels around the world, Ruth Johansen and Myrabeth Hughes performing as the Two Guitars, and Lois Gordon and Lillian Ito leading sing-a-longs.


“There were occasional visits by barbershop quartets and the fabulous “Steptacular Dancers”. We celebrated everything! Monday was Hug Day, Friday‑of course‑was TGIF Day. All birthdays were celebrated, along with Clown Day, Pancake Day and Malasada Day. On Lincoln's Birthday, Dr. Paul Brennan would show up dressed as Abraham Lincoln in top hat and all. My most unforgettable day was the one when, at the last moment, a fashion-show was cancelled. The participants were all assembled and with the 'show must go on' slogan in mind, I pleaded with Betty and David who were always game for anything. Out came the box of old clothes stored in the closet and they took turns modeling the most outrageous outfits ever seen. David used a Depends on his head and on his bottom. Betty donned a huge dress, stuffed with pillows and pretended to be drunk. I tried my best to be a dignified commentator while laughing so hard the tears flowed down my face. It was truly a joy to see the participants laughing so hard and to be able, for the moment, to forget their problems."


"Our annual open house was always a big hit. Family members would bring food and entertainment was provided. One year, we had a photographer on hand to take professional photos of the participants and their families. Another time, we held the party outdoors in the spacious yard featuring a Mexican theme.”


“As staff members left, new people were added, some to stay only a short time and others still there like Naomi Risco, Violet Takatani, Brenda Chaloupko, Jay Ogden, Pearl Robbins, Wilma Kennedy, and Kim Zandee. And, there was David Moody who added much joy and laughter during the time he was with us."


 

MAHALO FROM THE OHANA


The following letters are included here as examples of the impact the Center has had on family members - our Ohana.


“I will always be grateful for the help and support received from the Windward Senior Day Care Center situated next to St. Christopher's Church on Kainalu. In 1974, my husband had a stroke that left him totolly disabled. With no income, and a loss of his savings, I was distraught with fear of losing our home and having to go on welfare. A friend of mine told me about WSDCC and Natalie Oda. She comforted and consoled me over my grief and offered me a scholarship to care for my husband during the day, five times a week. Because of the care at the Center, I was able to work full time and with the help of social security and other agencies, we survived and still live in Kailua. Thank you, Natalie, Agnes, and Anarita.” ~ Mahalo and aloha, Barbara Chung


“My mother, Mitsue Kayanagi, really looked forward to going to the Center and being cared for by such a friendly and helpful staff. And as final proof of the good work done by the staff, I want to add that I got to know Emma Bessho, Natalie's irrepressible mother, who looked forward to coming to the Center every day for the happy atmosphere she found there”. ~ Harriet Wong


Former Board member Horace Williston has expressed his appreciation for the care his mother received in the six years she spent at the Center: “My mother looked forward to dressing up to go to the Center and enjoying the bus ride, which was improved by the view of the ducks on Kainui Drive en· route. She loved being welcomed and having attention paid to her by the caring aides at the Center. She liked the food and the music - especially the music. Although she no longer knew just who I was, she could remember the words to World War 1 hit tunes and the music of the thoughtful care given her - '20s and the '30s. Our family is very grateful for the thoughtful care given to her.”


 

THIRTY-FIVE YEARS OF COMMUNITY SERVICE

(Published in 2009)


Former Director, Kathleen Camara
Former Director, Kathleen Camara

After Sadie's many productive years at the Center, staff member Kathleen Camara was later selected to become the director in 2008. Her administration began at a time when the nation-wide trend for more alternatives to nursing homes showed that most adults prefer to age at home in their communities.


Windward O'ahu has been fortunate to have the WSDCC already in place to provide this service as envisioned by founder Hope Gray.


After undergoing the vicissitudes of the years since its founding in 1974. It is remarkable to recollect her concept of senior day care and observe how well It has prevailed.


"One purpose of the center" she wrote initially "is to provide an alternative to the traditional nursing home care. Another purpose is to do something about the deterioration of elderly people when their intellectual and spiritual needs go unattended. We provide attention and companionship for people who may not receive much of that during the day if they are left alone at home. We also provide physical exercise…[ ]. Seniors in our program enjoy being 'active spectators', hearing conversations and watching crafts - even if they don't participate. Others enjoy taking part in crafts as well as mild exercise. They also like singing and humming along to music. Of course, it is hard to generalize since each person is different... For the most part they are very attentive to their own needs and enjoy being with younger people which is where our staff comes In...[ ]. Their [Our Seniors’] abilities can be maintained through participation. We have noticed that after about six months, our clients have not deteriorated in their abilities. If we can prevent further slipping, then this program may help some stay out of the nursing home environment. And there is a substantial financial savings in this program as opposed to nursing home care."


 

More Photos...




An important message from the original publication: In spite of careful scrutiny, inaccuracies sometimes occur in publications such as this, which is based on the recollections of people and events in the past. We are grateful to all who have contributed to the Center's success with their time, energy, money, and countless donations. Many are mentioned in the text, but our aging minds have without doubt forgotten others, please forgive us but know you are included in our appreciation.




Kommentare


bottom of page